Find a Fentanyl Rehab Today | Principle Recovery

Find a Fentanyl Rehab Today

At this point, everyone in the country is likely familiar with opioids and the decimation they brought on families from coast to coast.

Fentanyl is a monster in its own right and worth diving into to understand better.

What Is Fentanyl?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) describe fentanyl as such; “a synthetic opioid, approved for treating severe pain, typically advanced cancer pain. It is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine”.

It bears repeating, fentanyl is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine. Truly astounding.

Given its potency, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) categorizes it as a Schedule II drug, or one with a “high potential for abuse, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous”.

When prescribed by doctors, it’s commonly taken as a shot, a patch or lozenge similar to a cough drop and works just like other opioids by binding to opioid receptors to alleviate pain and create a sense of euphoria.

When procured illegally, it can come in powder, liquid or pill form and is often mixed with other drugs because it takes so little to create a big effect on the user.

Because of this, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), fentanyl has driven the steep rise in opioid overdoses since 2013. They add that “synthetic opioids, including fentanyl, are now the most common drugs involved in drug overdose deaths in the United States”.

Recent figures from the CDC show that “overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids were nearly 12 times higher in 2019 than in 2013” with more than 36,000 deaths in 2019 alone.

In general, it’s the illegally produced, non-pharmaceutical fentanyl that’s the culprit in overdoses.

Lastly, because of how strong it is, fentanyl is very addictive and extremely difficult to break away from without assistance.

What Are the Signs of a Fentanyl Addiction?

Knowing what a fentanyl addiction looks like is the place to start in helping yourself or a loved one get clear of it.

Signs of addiction can look like this:

  • Unable to stop using on your own
  • Taking larger doses because a tolerance has developed
  • Spending a large chunk of your day and money getting, using and recovering from fentanyl
  • Severe cravings
  • Failing to meet obligations at work, home or school
  • Continuing to use despite overtly negative outcomes
  • Not participating in activities that once brought joy
  • Legal and financial trouble due to needing to get money for fentanyl
  • Putting yourself in dangerous situations
  • Withdrawal symptoms develop when you stop using
  • Difficulty breathing, coughing, sneezing and chest pain
  • Convulsions and chills
  • Pain in the back or sides
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Pale skin
  • Severe constipation and /or black stool
  • Ulcers and sores in the mouth
  • Sunken eyes
  • Swollen feet, ankles and hands and/or numbness in the extremities
  • Generally fatigued
  • Loss of appetite
  • Mood swings and irritability
  • Depression
  • Insomnia

As you can see, fentanyl takes a severe toll, wreaking absolute havoc on your system and only getting worse the longer it goes unchecked.

Why You Should Go to a Fentanyl Rehab

Addiction to a substance that’s so powerful and so devastating requires equally formidable action. Fentanyl rehab is that type of action.

Getting dedicated and customized treatment for your addiction in a supportive environment increases your odds of success immensely.

After safely detoxing under the guidance and supervision of specialists, you’ll begin an individualized treatment program; for fentanyl, it’s often an inpatient program given how powerful the drug is. In rehab, you’ll be surrounded by people who truly understand what you’re going through and participate in one-on-one psychotherapy to work through what led you to fentanyl in the first place. This is complemented by group work where you can build bonds with others and realize you’re never alone on this journey. To learn more about fentanyl rehab, reach out to us at Principles Recovery Center.

Drug Rehab Facilities in Florida Explained

Drug Rehab Facilities in Florida Explained

There are few things in life more empowering than the decision to seek help for an addiction and realize you do have the power to take control over your life back.

It’s a tough journey, no doubt, but one that only gets better as you go.

With the ocean breeze and sunshine soothing the soul, drug rehab facilities in Florida make those arduous early days a bit more pleasant and set you up for long-term success.

What Are the Common Signs and Symptoms of Addiction?

Addiction may feel like it pops up unannounced overnight like your in-laws but, truth be told, there are warning signs and symptoms that emerge and metastasize.

Our natural inclination is sometimes to excuse these signs because no one wants to suspect the worst of their family member or friend; that they’re an addict. They’re just stressed, they’re actually in control of their usage, they’re not hurting anyone, they’re always a little moody, etc. It’s understandable but it’s also enabling.

In order to get your loved one the help they need to overcome addiction, you must be on the lookout for these symptoms and act when you know they’ve reached a tipping point so to speak.

The signs of substance abuse are a mixed bag between behavioral and physical and can include:

  • Being overly secretive and lying
  • Unable to quit despite efforts to do so
  • Losing interest in events or activities they once enjoyed so they can use
  • Insomnia or, conversely, sleeping too much
  • Financial issues and unpredictability related to buying drugs or alcohol
  • Borrowing or stealing to pay for substances
  • School, work and/or family life and obligations are all suffering
  • Considerable changes in weight, up or down
  • Paranoia
  • Spending a disproportionate amount of time using substances, thinking about them, acquiring them and recovering from their effects 
  • Developing tolerance and taking increasingly larger doses to get the same effect as before
  • Mood swings and irritability
  • Continuing to use despite clear negative ramifications
  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Engaging in risky behavior, i.e., driving under the influence
  • Shifting to a different group of friends who use as well
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms when you stop using
  • Body odor, wearing dirty clothes, hair unkempt, etc. a general lack of care for personal hygiene

A person may not experience everything listed but someone who’s addicted will certainly exhibit some of them. It’s critical to pay attention and take action before things spiral fully out of control.

What that action will look like is different for everyone. A good place to start is getting educated on addiction yourself and talking to experts on the next steps, you can even reach out to us at Principles Recovery Center to learn more and get advice.

Why Principles Should Be Your Drug Rehab Facility in Florida

There ain’t much better than the Florida coast.

Over 8,000 miles of shoreline – 8,436 to be exact – a relaxed environment and well over 200 sunny days (hence our nickname; The Sunshine State) makes Florida a pretty enviable place to be.

We get it, it’s why we’re based here and it’s part of how we started.

At Principles Recovery Center, we’ve been treating substance abuse for over 30 years and our combined experience means we’ve done just about everything in that time.

The beauty of Principles, aside from the location, is that you can take your entire recovery journey with us which creates an unrivaled sense of comfort and trust. You’ll be able to transition smoothly from inpatient care to outpatient rehab and once you’ve wrapped up treatment we’ll help you with aftercare options as well as a lively alumni program that helps you maintain connections with us and those you’ve met in rehab.

Give us a call to discover more about why Principles is the right place for you or a loved one.

What Are Trauma Therapy Modalities in Addiction Treatment?

What Are Trauma Therapy Modalities in Addiction Treatment?

Treatment for addiction will look different for everyone. There’s no silver bullet or one-size-fits-all solution that is recommended for each person dealing with addiction. Just as you’re a unique individual who fell into substance abuse due to the very personal circumstances of your own life, climbing out of it requires a similarly individualized plan.

Because of that, there are a number of therapies that can be used either in tandem or by themselves to build a rehab program that suits your story and can help you overcome addiction.

This is particularly important because often, a substance use disorder (SUD) will coincide with a trauma-induced mental disorder.

Are Trauma and Substance Abuse Related?

Not only are trauma and substance abuse related but mental illness, in general, is linked with addiction in what’s known as a comorbidity, which is defined by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) as:

“When a person has two or more disorders at the same time or one after the other. This occurs frequently with substance use and mental disorders. Comorbidity also means that interactions between these two disorders can worsen the course of both.”

They go on to note that, “of the 20.3 million adults with substance use disorders, 37.9% also had mental illnesses” and “among the 42.1 million adults with mental illness, 18.2% also had substance use disorders”.

Trauma very much falls into this equation with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) pointing out that “substance use (e.g., smoking, excessive alcohol use, and taking drugs), mental health conditions (e.g., depression, anxiety, or PTSD), and other risky behaviors (e.g., self-injury and risky sexual encounters) have been linked with traumatic experiences”.

Drugs and alcohol are used as coping mechanisms to deal with the unresolved and untreated trauma a person is living with. Escapism in a sense.

This cuts across all parts of society.

For example, a study about urban populations found that “there are high rates of lifetime dependence on various substances in this high-risk population. Additionally, the level of substance use, particularly cocaine, is strongly associated with levels of childhood physical, sexual, and emotional abuse as well as current PTSD symptoms.”

And the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adds, “more than 2 of 10 Veterans with PTSD also have SUD”

What Are the Different Trauma Therapy Modalities in Addiction Treatment?

Fortunately, dual-diagnosis treatment – a type of rehab that helps you work through trauma and addiction – is available.

In fact, there are several trauma therapy modalities out there and we’ll touch on a couple of the most notable here:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

An evidence-based type of psychotherapy, or talk therapy, is predicated on helping you recognize and identify negative and detrimental thought patterns that have a destructive impact on your life and shift them.

It’s been called the “gold standard of psychotherapy”.

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT)

A type of cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavioral therapy is also a form of talk therapy with the distinction being that it’s more about acceptance, living in the moment, coping with stressors and improving how you deal with others.

How Principles Recovery Center Can Help You With Addiction Today

When you consider the seemingly infinite ways in which someone can find their lives intertwined with substances, the ability to have your treatment be specific to your circumstances is crucial. Be it CBT, DBT, group therapy or holistic options, a customized rehab experience goes a long way in creating positive outcomes.

At Principles Recovery Center in Davie, Florida, our 30+ years of combined experience treating substance abuse through dual-diagnosis treatment mean we’re well suited to help you beat your addiction and resolve the trauma at the root of it.

Reach out to us today to learn more and get on the road to recovery.

One of the Best Rehabs in Florida

Best rehabs in Florida

When you think of Florida, you no doubt think of sea and sun, it’s why we’re known as the Sunshine State after all.

In recent years though, it’s become much more than just a vacation destination and is now well regarded for the quality drug and alcohol treatment centers throughout the state too.

We’d humbly submit that our own facility, Principles Recovery Center, is among the best rehabs in Florida.

Located in Davie, Florida just outside of Fort Lauderdale and stone’s throw from the coast, what makes Principles an exceptional choice comes down to one word: experience.

Sure, the beach is nice but what you really need in recovery is a team of caring and dedicated professionals who’ve devoted their lives to not only providing help for those who need it most but continuously improving along the way.

We’ve been at this for over 30 years and that commitment to helping you confront and overcome addiction has been and will remain, our driving force.

Addiction Treatment We Offer At Principles Recovery Center

Treatment for substance abuse is a process and we can take you from the beginning all the way through to the end (in Spanish too!).

Detoxification

The very first step of that process, just after deciding to enter rehab, is detox. Substance use disorders (SUDs) may be classed as brain disorders but addiction is heavily interwoven with the body as well. You need to break the physical dependency before we can help you through the mental side of it. While we don’t offer detox at our facility, we partner with many facilities in the area who you can detox with before visiting us. 

Inpatient Care

Detox isn’t a treatment in and of itself, it’s just the start. The next step for those with more severe addiction is most likely going to be a stay in inpatient care. We create a highly customized program suited to your needs and you live with us for 1 to 3 months on average, getting the 24/7 care, guidance and support you need. While we don’t offer traditional inpatient care, we have onsite housing for our clients that join us for partial hospitalization. You get all of the benefits of inpatient care with just a little more freedom. 

Partial Hospitalization

Think of this as a step below inpatient care, it essentially affords you all the benefits of an inpatient program without having to be an inpatient. In other words, you can go home in the evenings. Typically, this would be 25 hours a week and can be used as a transition from inpatient care or a starting point.

Outpatient

Another step down in terms of intensity and time commitment is outpatient care. We use all the same methods and modalities you would encounter in the aforementioned treatments with the difference here being that the sessions are shorter, affording you more time for work, school or family life. You can expect 12 to 20 hours depending on the severity of your addiction.

Dual-Diagnosis

Addiction doesn’t always happen on its own. Often people have a co-occurring mental illness along with their substance abuse problem and treating one without touching the other is setting yourself for failure. It’s critical to address and treat both disorders so you can build your newly gained sobriety on a sturdy foundation.

Adolescents & Teens

Not everyone experiences a substance use disorder in the same way and that’s particularly true for teens. More importantly, if we can get to adolescents and young people before things get out of hand, we can help them avoid a prolonged addiction and the difficulties associated with it later in life.

Aftercare

Recovery doesn’t end when your program does, it’s an ongoing and lifelong journey. At Principles Recovery Center we offer aftercare planning services that help set you up for the rest of your life, things like; career workshops, developing your interview skills, assistance with finding housing and more.

Alumni Program

It’s important to stay connected, you’re part of the PRC family after all! During your time with us, you’ll make connections with us and we’ll connect deeply with you too, so we make it easy to stay connected long after you’ve moved on because those relationships are cherished!

With alumni meetings, remote outpatient care, events and a newsletter you’ll never be too far from a friend.

How to Get Yourself or Your Loved One Help With Addiction Today

Whether it’s for yourself or someone close to you, overcoming addiction is possible.

Reach out to us today to learn more about how Principles Recovery Center can help you achieve lasting sobriety. 

Tips for Overcoming Trauma and Addiction

Tips for overcoming trauma and addiction

Traumatic experiences can come to hold immense power over your thoughts, feelings and actions in life. Touching all aspects of your inner world as well as wreaking havoc on your external relationships. 

While some may go through a harrowing experience and be able to easily put it behind them, for others overcoming trauma is a much more arduous journey. In the worst cases, trauma can lead you down the road of addiction and the potentially fatal consequences that accompany prolonged substance abuse.

The co-occurrence of the two – trauma and addiction – isn’t uncommon either, with studies showing that “individuals with PTSD were 2 to 4 times more likely than individuals without PTSD to meet criteria for an SUD (substance use disorder)”.

Before getting into the tips for working through anything though, we need to properly define the terms.

What Is Trauma?

As defined by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), “individual trauma results from an event, series of events, or set of circumstances that is experienced by an individual as physically or emotionally harmful or life-threatening and that has lasting adverse effects on the individual’s functioning and mental, physical, social, emotional, or spiritual well-being”.

What qualifies as a traumatic event is different for each person, some examples are:

  • Sexual or physical abuse
  • Domestic violence
  • Divorce and separation from parents
  • Combat
  • Serious illness
  • Death of family member or friend
  • Natural disaster
  • Significant medical procedures 

Importantly, keep in mind that something can be traumatic for one person and have no effect on another and, also, there’s no statute of limitations on when trauma can affect you. Trauma experienced in childhood has a well-documented adverse effect in adults.

What Is Addiction?

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) defines addiction as “a chronic, relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use despite adverse consequences. It is considered a brain disorder because it involves functional changes to brain circuits involved in reward, stress, and self-control. Those changes may last a long time after a person has stopped taking drugs”.

Tips for Overcoming Trauma and Addiction – Dual Diagnosis Treatment

When you’re dealing with two or more disorders simultaneously, it’s referred to as a comorbidity. NIDA explains “this occurs frequently with substance use and mental disorders. Comorbidity also means that interactions between these two disorders can worsen the course of both”.

Given that, the best tip for working through co-occurring disorders is to treat them both at the same time.

There isn’t a silver bullet or shortcut to overcoming one and not the other because they tend to make each other worse, as mentioned. Trauma may well lead you to substances as a coping mechanism to get through the difficulties. 

As your dependency on drugs or alcohol grows you feel like you need the substance to feel “normal”. As your tolerance builds, you consequently need more and more to feel like “yourself” and avoid thinking about the trauma that brought on the addiction to begin with.

That cycle becomes dangerous quickly.

Getting treatment for only your substance use disorder and not addressing the trauma that preceded and caused it, in many ways leaves you untreated. Sure, you may leave rehab sober but the coping mechanisms you learned might not stand a chance when something triggers you to remember that prior traumatic experience.

That’s why working through them together, in a dual-diagnosis treatment program, gives you the best shot at overcoming them both and leading a substance-free life without the pain and torment of trauma.

If trauma (or any other mental disorder) and addiction seem insurmountable for you or a loved one, reach out to us at Principles Recovery Center in South Florida, and we can shine more light on the benefits of dual-diagnosis treatment.

The First Step to Getting Clean: Drug Detox in Florida

First steps to getting clean in Florida

Drug addiction is something that takes hold of the body and mind.

The longer you or a loved one is addicted, the more control is lost and the stronger the dependency grows.

That’s the nature of the beast.

It doesn’t get better until you choose to get better and getting to the point that you can confidently make that choice is a big win in its own right. Once you’ve decided to commit to getting clean though, a new journey begins; the one towards sobriety.

As the saying goes, a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

And the first step is detox.

Why Is Drug Detox Usually the First Step to Take When Getting Clean?

As mentioned, a substance use disorder is both mental and physical. In order to treat the mental side of addiction, you first have to break the physical dependency. 

In layman’s terms, detox is the process of the body ridding itself of drugs or alcohol.

Depending on the severity of the addiction and the substance, this can be assisted by medication to help mitigate the withdrawal symptoms.

Of course, detox on its own is not the end of the road. It’s not rehab or a “cure” by itself. It’s merely a step. An absolutely critical and imperative one but still just one step on the road to recovery with the next typically being inpatient or outpatient care.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse puts it this way, “detoxification alone does not address the psychological, social, and behavioral problems associated with addiction and therefore does not typically produce lasting behavioral changes necessary for recovery. Detoxification should thus be followed by a formal assessment and referral to drug addiction treatment”.

Why You Want to Detox From Drugs at a Rehab

It’s tempting to go it alone and try to detox at home – through sheer power of will – but there are a number of reasons why that may not be the best idea.

Dangerous to Do It at Home or Alone

Simply put, it’s unsafe and depending on the substance, withdrawal may actually kill you. Detox from alcohol and benzodiazepine, for example, can be fatal if done without proper care and guidance.

With more severe addiction, it’s particularly important to detox at a rehab because medication-assisted detox is an option to lessen the effects of withdrawal.

Avoid Temptation

Withdrawal symptoms are not pleasant and that’s just about the nicest way to put it. Your body and mind have both grown accustomed to a constant supply of chemicals – a supply which increases steadily as you build a tolerance – cutting it off abruptly throws your entire system into havoc.

If you’re on your own, you could easily succumb to the discomfort and fall back to using it to get relief. 

Supervised, Safe & Supported

Choosing to detox at a rehab means you’re able to overcome the dangers of quitting cold turkey and the cravings that withdrawal brings.

How?

Because at a facility, you’re under the supervision of trained addiction specialists and supported by the staff 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Should any complications arise there are medical professionals on hand to administer aid and manage the situation safely. 

Everyone is there to help guide you safely through the process and get you to a point where you can take the next step in recovery which is starting to work on the mental side of addiction.

Reach Out to Us Today at Principles Recovery Center for Help With Your Addiction

Ultimately, getting clean requires cleaning out the body and detoxification under the direction and care of experts is the best way to minimize risk and maximize the possibility of success.

Reach out to us at Principles Recovery Center to learn more about our program for alcohol and drug detox in Florida.

Outpatient Treatment Center Explained

Drug and alcohol outpatient rehbailitaiton treatment center

The realization that an addiction to drugs or alcohol has taken over your life is one that can hit hard and stop your life in its tracks – or at least it feels that way. Like it brings the spin of the earth to a halt.

In reality though, life around you does go on. Your responsibilities to family and friends carry on and the job you managed to maintain continues to require doing.

Depending on the severity of your addiction, it may be in your best interest to opt for inpatient care, where you live at a treatment center. In that case, you’re fully pulled out of that life – your former world – and focus 100% of your energy and attention on rehabilitation.

For those with the most severe issues with substance use, that could be the right way to go but what if your addiction isn’t that intense? What if your work or family life absolutely requires your presence? What is after you finish inpatient you still need help? 

How do you square that circle and make it work while getting the care for addiction you genuinely need?

Outpatient treatment.

What Is Outpatient Treatment?

For starters, let’s quickly discuss what inpatient treatment is because one informs the other.

As previously stated, inpatient rehab requires you to live at the facility where you’re being treated. Any reputable recovery center will create a highly structured and personalized plan that is suited to your particular needs.

Though the methods and modalities will vary from rehab to rehab, the foundation of most programs is in psychotherapy, or talk therapy. Here at Principles Recovery Center, for example, we utilize cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, dialectical behavior therapy and more – in both individual and group settings – to help you work through the mental aspects of addiction during our outpatient programs. 

That’s in addition to complementary and holistic treatment options that work to create a well-rounded path to recovery.

How does that relate to outpatient care?

Well, rehab at an outpatient treatment center encompasses the same things and it uses the very same tools to aid you in your journey towards lasting sobriety. The key difference is that with outpatient rehab you are not required to live at the facility.

The quality of care isn’t any less than that of inpatient care, it’s simply designed and intended for a different subset of the recovery population. Someone suffering from the most severe, heavy addiction wouldn’t necessarily be an ideal candidate for outpatient treatment because they genuinely need the 24/7 support, guidance and supervision that inpatient rehab provides.

However, just like addiction itself, there are different degrees of outpatient care.

Intensive outpatient program (IOP), for instance, is one of these degrees. Somewhere between partial hospitalization and more run-of-the-mill outpatient treatment, patients undergoing intensive outpatient care spend substantially more time in treatment, often in the neighborhood of 20 hours a week or so – but still go home at the end of the day. 

Who Should Go to an Outpatient Treatment Center?

Outpatient care, the standard kind, is the type of treatment that requires the least time and is, therefore, the most accessible.

For those who have work, school or familial responsibilities that must be fulfilled, outpatient treatment offers both the flexibility and structure to allow you to do what you have to while still getting the critical support for recovery that you need. It’s a treatment option that you can incorporate into your schedule.

Additionally, rather than jumping straight back into the grind of daily life, outpatient rehab is also especially useful as a transitional tool for those who have completed an inpatient program. Offering something of a safety net as you reintegrate into your day-to-day.  To find out if outpatient treatment is right for you or a loved one, get in touch with us at Principles Recovery Center. We’d be happy to give you more information and tell you about our South Florida outpatient program.

Get Help with Depression and Alcohol Abuse Today

Depression and Alcohol Abuse Today

Depression and alcohol abuse are two things that often go hand in hand with one another and serve to make the other worse. Depression can very well lead people to alcohol as a coping mechanism and in turn create a self-perpetuating cycle that leads to yet greater consumption of alcohol.

Let’s first define both depression and alcohol abuse, or alcohol use disorder (AUD), though.

Depression – Beyond just the standard blues or feeling sad, depression is a serious mood disorder and medical illness that negatively affects how you feel, think and act and affects everything from your sleep to your work. You can think of it as feeling down, low and hopeless for weeks at a time.

In 2017, 17.3 million American adults had at least one major depressive episode.

Alcohol Use Disorder – Not just simply problem drinking, AUD is a chronic relapsing brain disorder characterized by an impaired ability to stop or control alcohol use despite adverse social, occupational, or health consequences.

Roughly 15 million people in the United States have alcohol use disorder.

Can Depression and Alcohol Abuse Be Connected?

Broadly speaking, serious mental illness (SMI) and substance abuse disorder (SUD) co-occur with a disconcertingly high frequency with roughly 1 in 4 people with SMI also having a SUD.

Concerning depression and alcohol specifically, they very much can be connected, a recent study noted that “depressive disorders are the most common psychiatric disorders among people with AUD. The co-occurrence of these disorders is associated with greater severity and worse prognosis than either disorder alone, including a heightened risk for suicidal behavior”.

Adding to that were findings from previous research showed that the “prevalence of depression among alcohol-dependent persons is high (63.8%) with a significant association between depression and the mean AUDIT score (alcohol use disorders identification test). At posttest, depressed participants had a statistically significant craving for alcohol…Alcohol dependence is associated with major depression.”

People are using alcohol to quite literally drown their sorrows as the famous saying goes. To escape those feelings of sadness, if only temporarily, with the sedative effects of alcohol. The irony, as we’ve already covered, is that avoiding dealing with depression by consuming alcohol only serves to make it worse.

Can I Receive Treatment for My Depression and Alcohol Abuse at the Same Time? 

Not only can you receive treatment for depression and alcohol abuse simultaneously, but that’s also exactly what you should do. Having AUD and depression at the same time, or any addiction and mental illness/disorder for that matter, is known as a co-occurring disorder or a dual diagnosis

Dual diagnosis treatment is critically important because it’s designed to tackle the connection between mental illness and addiction rather than keeping them in totally separate and distinct silos. Look at it this way, if you were to focus on solely beating depression but left your alcoholism untouched, your drinking could be a conduit for the depression to come right back. And vice versa, working only on your alcohol abuse leaves the underlying depression, perhaps a big underlying reason for your drinking to begin with, unexamined.

Because both depression and alcohol abuse fall under the roof of mental illness, treating them both in an integrated fashion tends to produce more effective and lasting outcomes. The goal is not to just work on the addiction but rather you as a whole person and offering a much more holistic and complete treatment than would otherwise be possible.

Get Help With Depression and Alcohol Abuse at Principles Recovery Center

At Principles Recovery Center in South Florida, we well understand the interplay of alcohol abuse and depression, substance abuse and mental illness, and have years of experience honing our program to help people get back to sober and fulfilling lives.

If you or a loved one is dealing with alcoholism and depression or are simply unsure if you have co-occurring illnesses, get in touch with us today and let’s discuss it.

Why it is Hard To Be Sober in a Culture Based Around Alcohol

From the earliest days of the United States, there has been a strong culture based around alcohol consumption. Indeed, many of the first immigrants to the new world started setting up breweries based around skills that were learned in Europe. Since that time, alcohol has been an integral part of the culture in the United States. People simply need to look around. Most major cities in the United States have hundreds of bars, sometimes right next door to each other. Days of the week are often based around drink specials and given nicknames to further promote them. Most restaurants also have drink specials that are designed to be paired with their food specials.

Indeed, the culture in the United States is based around alcohol as a social lubricant. Sure, drinking in moderation might work for some people; however, for those who are recovering from an addiction to alcohol, this can be a serious problem. For this reason, it is critical for everyone to know a few important points regarding staying sober in a culture that is based around alcohol.

Struggling with Sobriety is a Common Problem

In the United States, there are millions of people who damage their lives every year due to drinking in excess. When someone succumbs to the dangers of alcoholism, this can lead to serious health effects. Long-term alcohol use can lead to extensive liver damage that might progress to the point that it required a transplant. This is in addition to the numerous short-term health impacts including impaired judgment, difficulty breathing, acute alcohol poisoning, and the development of Delirium Tremens due to alcohol withdrawal.

Furthermore, an addiction to alcohol can also damage someone’s relationships with family members and friends. Personal relationships might get pushed to the side in favor of the altar of addiction. People might even sacrifice gainful employment just to feed this addiction. There is plenty of collateral damage that stems from an addiction to alcohol. For this reason, it is important for anyone who is struggling with alcoholism to rely on help from the professionals. The recovery process for anyone will begin with a single step.

The Pervasive Problem of Alcohol at Restaurants

It is important for people to be sensitive to the dangers of alcoholism and the countless people who have rebuilt their lives and are trying to stay sober. This becomes even more important when someone steps out into society. A quick scan of any restaurant menu will quickly reveal that the alcohol is placed at the top. Some restaurants even have an entire menu dedicated just to beer, wine, and liquor.

This is for good reason. Those who own bars and restaurants are running a business. Most will say that the big profits come from alcohol and not from food. A single well drink can exceed the cost of some entrees. Therefore, restaurants often prioritize alcohol on the menu, trying to push this harder than even their most expensive dishes. It should come as no surprise that many of the top supermarkets and restaurants end up cashing in on alcohol.

Alcohol and Sporting Events

Many people even say that alcohol has become ingrained into the sporting culture as well. People often tie sports and drinking together at a young age. Attending sporting events often involves a “pregame” before heading over where students try to create some sort of “slight buzz.” Then, the drinking continues once people reach the game.

Sadly, many of the people who drink alcohol are college students who are underage. Without proper supervision, many of these students end up with drinking problems that start during college. Even though many colleges have “sober dorms,” drinking still takes place here as well. This is a serious issue that becomes even greater for those who are recovering from an addiction to alcohol.

Maintaining Sobriety in Today’s Society

When someone ventures out into a world with alcohol at every turn, it can be hard to stay sober. There are a few ways that people can face this challenge head-on and remain successful during recovery. Make sure to share the challenges of addiction with family members and close friends. It is a good idea to go to social events with a buddy. This might be a friend or a buddy who is also in recovery. Furthermore, it is critical to know one’s limits and recognize the signals that someone’s personal resolve might be weakening. When this happens, be sure to ask for help. Nothing should ever come before someone’s continued, ardent, successful sobriety.

Trust Principles Recovery Center for Alcohol Abuse Treatment

Alcohol abuse is a serious problem in today’s society. Anyone who would like help in the Davie, FL area should rely on Principles Recovery Center. We provide family-focused treatment plans and even have a Spanish-speaking drug rehab program. Contact us today!

Can I Quit Drinking Alcohol “Cold Turkey”?

Nearly everyone who has ever struggled with alcohol abuse has heard the words, “why can’t you just quit?” or “just don’t drink”. These people generally have good intentions and just want the best for you, but probably don’t have the medical background or awareness to know just how dangerous this can be.

Obviously, not everyone who drinks alcohol has to take cautious steps in order to sober up, but for those who have crossed the invisible line into dependency, quitting alcohol “cold turkey” could potentially be fatal. Don’t panic, the detox process is simple if performed under quality care, but painful, terrifying, and dangerous if attempted without medical supervision and without medication.

What Does Quitting Cold Turkey Mean?

The debate over the origin of the term “cold turkey” is still unsettled. To put it simply, the oldest known usages of the term point to “outright” as being the closest synonym. However, in relation to drug or alcohol addiction, it’s been theorized that people started using the term in the late 1970s. Herb Caen of the San Francisco Chronicle stated in 1978, “it derives from the hideous combination of ‘goosepimples’ and what William Burroughs calls ‘the cold burn’ that addicts suffer as they kick the habit.”

In Cop Speak: The Lingo of Law Enforcement and Crime, Tom Philbin offers an alternate theory, that  “the term may derive from the cold, clammy feel of the skin during withdrawal, like a turkey that has been refrigerated”. Regardless of the etymology, quitting a substance “cold turkey” always has the same definition; it is the act of quitting an addiction to a substance, behavior, or habit abruptly.

Why is Quitting Alcohol More Dangerous than Quitting Other Drugs?

The side effects of detoxing from alcohol can be quite severe, depending on how often a person drinks and how much they drink. To illustrate what happens, I’ll use a personal experience since alcohol was always my drug of choice.

Towards the end of my active addiction, I needed at least four standard drinks to get out of bed (1 beer = 1 glass of wine = 1 shot, roughly) without full body shakes, projectile vomiting, cold sweats, and a chronic state of anxiety. This continued throughout the day, causing me to need about two handles of vodka daily. You see, at this point, I didn’t even want to be drunk anymore; I needed to drink to avoid getting very sick and to simply function.

Common minor side effects of alcohol withdrawal include:

  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Fever, chills, excessive sweating
  • “The shakes”

Major side effects that can occur from severe alcohol abuse and alcoholism include:

  • Dangerously high blood pressure and stroke
  • Convulsions and seizures
  • Liver damage, fatty liver, cirrhosis, and liver failure
  • Delirium tremens, hallucinations, a complete break from reality
  • Coma and/or death

Due to the serious side effects that come along with quitting alcohol, it’s never advised to quit cold turkey. Friends and family may not understand and could pressure an alcoholic into “drying out”. It is imperative that you attempt to educate them on the seriousness of this problem. Prisons that operate ethically won’t even let an alcoholic go without medication to get them sober due to the risks involved.

So How Do I Quit Drinking Alcohol?

Medical detoxification is the safest, most effective, and most comfortable way to get physically sober. I know it sounds scary to leave your home and voluntarily put yourself into an “institution”, but it’s nothing like the movies make it seem.

If it weren’t for detox facilities, I wouldn’t be writing this blog right now. I wouldn’t be writing anything right now. I wouldn’t be here. (Turns out at one ER visit they told me that I was a day away from death!). In my final detox stay back before I got sober for the long-run, I was in a wheelchair for four days before my legs would stop shaking. The meds I received definitely helped ease my symptoms, and I was in no condition to be attempting this on my own.

Most of the time, there are no requirements to participate in any kind of group therapy or meetings, unless you’re interested. There is staff around at all times for when you’re really going through it. When your mind is running wild and you think you’re going crazy — you don’t necessarily want to be at home alone sweating it out on your couch. On the other hand, if you live with others, you won’t want them to be around during this time. Trust me on this one.

Have you tried to stop drinking on your own, but find you don’t get hangovers anymore? Do you wake up with your fingers shaking and need a little “hair of the dog” to start your day? We can help. Call Principles Recovery Center today at 1-866-692-0909.