Are Shaky Hands A Sign of Alcoholism?

Are Shaky Hands A Sign of Alcoholism?

If you have noticed tremors, twitching, or “shaky” hands and you believe it is related to problematic drinking, you should seek help as soon as possible. Shaky hands are a possible sign that your drinking has developed into alcoholism.

Ignoring it isn’t a solution. Investigating may uncover a deeper, more uncomfortable, and costly issue, but it’ll get you on the path to a solution. 

Are Shaky Hands A Sign of Alcoholism?

Maybe.

No doubt an unsatisfying answer, but as with all things in life, the answer depends on each individual’s circumstance and person.

It’s possible that those shaky hands are just the result of a hangover from a night of binging. While binge drinking is itself a problem, it doesn’t necessarily equate to full-blown alcoholism. You might’ve even come across the term “hangover shakes” en route to this article.

Why do these tremors occur? Alcohol is a depressant, meaning it slows down the primary functions of the brain and central nervous system. This can interfere with the chemicals in the brain that helps regulate our moods and behavior, which is how the feeling of being “drunk” occurs.

As the effects of alcohol wear off on the body, the brain and nervous system begin to rapidly speed back up, no longer slowed by the depressant effects. This process can cause tremors and shaking hands in some individuals.

For people with a problematic relationship with alcohol, consuming an excessive amount of alcohol can lead to a person experiencing heavy shakes all over their body. This event is often called “hangover shakes” and is a sign of a problem drinker.

What Are the Classic Signs of An Alcohol Addiction?

While different substances can prevent various symptoms, the behavior of an addict is often similar no matter what substance is being abused:

  • Drinking more than planned or for longer than planned
  • Inability to cut back despite best efforts to do so
  • Spending a lot of time getting drinks, drinking, or recovering from hangovers
  • Cravings
  • Work, school, and home life responsibilities are unmet
  • Drinking causes relationship problems
  • Not going to social, occupational, or other activities because you can’t drink
  • Using despite apparent adverse effects
  • Finding yourself in increasingly dangerous situations
  • Building a tolerance which requires more drinks to feel the same effects
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms when not drinking

These won’t happen all at once, but as the alcohol addiction worsens, you’ll see more evidence of these signs.

How To Get Help with Alcohol Addiction Today

The first order of business is recognizing that an addiction to alcohol exists. That’s square one.

From there, it’s about detoxing safely. Alcohol is one of those substances that have distinct dangers when it comes to withdrawal. Delirium tremens happen to those with the most severe and chronic addiction to alcohol. Among other things, they manifest as tremors and can be fatal. Research shows that it “has an anticipated mortality of up to 37% without appropriate treatment”.

Once you’ve gotten through the detoxification under the guidance and support of professionals, it’s time to work on the mental side of alcohol addiction. That’s where a rehab program can be effective. Working with a group of addiction specialists – the team at Principles Recovery Center having over 30 years of experience in substance abuse programs – makes the road to recovery easier. Through evidence-based group and individual work, you’ll be able to develop the tools needed for sustained sobriety. To learn more, reach out to us today.

Finding Outpatient Heroin Treatment Near Me

Finding Outpatient Heroin Treatment Near Me

Heroin exploded in use over the past 20 odd years with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) noting that in 2016 “about 948,000 Americans reported using heroin in the past year, a number that has been on the rise since 2007”.

They go on to say that “the number of people meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria for dependence or heroin use disorder increased dramatically from 214,000 in 2002 to 626,000 in 2016”.

Alarming figures which are rendered even more tragic when you consider the death toll heroin has brought. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that “the number of heroin-involved overdose deaths was more than seven times higher in 2019 than in 1999. Nearly a third of all opioid deaths involved heroin.”

In total, roughly 130,000 people died from an overdose related to heroin between 1999 and 2019.

Signs of a Heroin Addiction

As per NIDA, heroin is an opioid made from morphine which means the signs of addiction will look very much like what an opioid addiction looks like.

  • Taken in larger amounts or longer than was intended
  • Lack ability to control use or cut back, even when trying
  • Immense cravings
  • Constipation
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Spending a lot of time getting, using and recovering from heroin
  • Depression, mood swings and anxiety
  • Failing to fulfill obligations and responsibilities at work, school and home
  • Heroin causing significant interpersonal problems and fraying relationships
  • Slurred speech and disorientation
  • Intense itchiness
  • Track marks from needles
  • Personal hygiene getting worse
  • Change in sleep patterns and weight
  • Skipping activities or engagements in order to use
  • Using despite clear physical and mental issues heroin is causing
  • Developing a tolerance and thus needing larger doses for the same high
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms if not using

Clearly there are quite a few things to look out for.

If you see any of these, make a note and don’t make an excuse for it. Keep track of these symptoms because as the addiction worsens, you’ll see more and more signs pop up. 

What Is Outpatient Heroin Treatment Near Me?

It’s a classic thing to Google – outpatient heroin treatment near me – when you find yourself in the unfortunate position of having a loved one dealing with a heroin addiction or being in that spot yourself. 

The silver lining here is that when you punch that in the search bar, a lot of answers come up which means there’s hope and addiction specialists out there who care about you.

But before you can look for anything, it’s important to understand what outpatient treatment is. It’s essentially rehab that you can schedule around your life. With inpatient care, you stop everything and live at a dedicated facility. With outpatient treatment you’ll participate in the same types of individual and group therapy but you’ll have scheduled times to come in that work for you.

For more severe addictions, you may consider partial hospitalization which is sort of in-between inpatient and outpatient.

Knowing When It’s Time To Go to Outpatient Heroin Treatment Near Me

This is another classic question however the answers are less concrete on this one.

A substance use disorder hits each person differently and generally speaking, knowing when it goes from recreational to problematic usage is inherently a grey area. With heroin, because it’s an illegal drug, you don’t want to wait particularly long before taking action though.

We all know the damage opioids have caused over the years and while admitting you need help is hard, becoming another statistic is far worse.

Call us and we’ll help you figure out if now is the time to commit to treatment.

Addiction Treatment Centers in Hollywood, FL Explained

x\Addiction Treatment Centers in Hollywood, FL Explained

It seems like substance use is something that touches everyone these days, unfortunately.

The results from the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) paint a bleak picture:

  • An estimated 164.8 million people aged 12 or older in the United States (60.2%) were past-month substance users
  • 1 in 5 people aged 12 or older (19.4 percent) used an illicit drug in the past year, which is a higher percentage than in 2015 and 2016

Meanwhile, also in 2018 and from the same report, an estimated 21.1 million people 12 and over needed substance use treatment according to SAMHSA. Of that number though, only 1.4% received treatment within the past year and even less, .9%, did so at a specialty facility.

Some harrowing numbers to process and those are pre-pandemic numbers. COVID-19 has only exacerbated an already out of control problem with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) noting, “provisional data show that drug overdoses have accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic. More than 93,000 drug overdose deaths were estimated to have occurred in the United States in 2020, the highest number of overdose deaths ever recorded in a 12-month period and a nearly 30% increase from 2019”.

So, how can you help yourself or a loved one, particularly in these trying times?

What Are Treatment Centers in Hollywood, FL?

Treatment centers in Hollywood, FL are a good place to start.

Florida has long been a vacation destination for many, and rightfully so, but interestingly Florida is also on the map as a destination for addiction treatment. Especially South Florida, in places like the Hollywood-Fort Lauderdale area where Principles Recovery Center is located.

At our recovery center, one with over 30 years of experience treating addiction, you can lay the foundations for a brighter future no matter the scope of your substance abuse.

We offer inpatient care, outpatient rehab, dual diagnosis treatment for those suffering from co-occurring disorders as well as specialized programs for adolescents & teens, aftercare, and even dedicated treatment for those who speak Spanish as their first language.

That said, why Florida in general?

The Benefits of Going to a Treatment Center in Hollywood, FL

As mentioned a moment ago, when you think vacation, Florida is always a contender and a lot of the same reasons that make it a great vacation location also make it a prime spot for rehab.

Let’s take a look at a few of the benefits:

Weather and a Change of Setting

Simply put, sunlight and perfect temps make life brighter, warmer, and a lot easier. Recovering from addiction in a place like that, notably, if you’re coming from a cold, grey climate, is a gamechanger.

Relaxing Environment

Bring together the breeze off the ocean, palm trees, nature, seagulls, gentle waves lapping on the shoreline, and again, that sunlight, and you’ve got the makings of a laid-back environment conducive to creating change.

Things to Do

If you get too relaxed though, rest assured, there are plenty of things to keep you busy outside of treatment if needed. Beaches, fishing, concerts, theme parks, whatever you want. Florida is a top vacation destination for a reason after all.

Robust Resources and Community

Because South Florida is a mecca for addiction treatment centers you have a lot of resources and addiction experts at your disposal. On top of that, a large community devoted to recovery means you can always find a support group or 12-step meeting for additional support.

To learn more about all that Florida offers, and Hollywood, FL, specifically, reach out to us Principles Recovery Center and we’d be happy to talk your ear off about how much we love it here (and how you would too!).

Find a Fentanyl Rehab Today | Principle Recovery

Find a Fentanyl Rehab Today

At this point, everyone in the country is likely familiar with opioids and the decimation they brought on families from coast to coast.

Fentanyl is a monster in its own right and worth diving into to understand better.

What Is Fentanyl?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) describe fentanyl as such; “a synthetic opioid, approved for treating severe pain, typically advanced cancer pain. It is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine”.

It bears repeating, fentanyl is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine. Truly astounding.

Given its potency, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) categorizes it as a Schedule II drug, or one with a “high potential for abuse, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous”.

When prescribed by doctors, it’s commonly taken as a shot, a patch or lozenge similar to a cough drop and works just like other opioids by binding to opioid receptors to alleviate pain and create a sense of euphoria.

When procured illegally, it can come in powder, liquid or pill form and is often mixed with other drugs because it takes so little to create a big effect on the user.

Because of this, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), fentanyl has driven the steep rise in opioid overdoses since 2013. They add that “synthetic opioids, including fentanyl, are now the most common drugs involved in drug overdose deaths in the United States”.

Recent figures from the CDC show that “overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids were nearly 12 times higher in 2019 than in 2013” with more than 36,000 deaths in 2019 alone.

In general, it’s the illegally produced, non-pharmaceutical fentanyl that’s the culprit in overdoses.

Lastly, because of how strong it is, fentanyl is very addictive and extremely difficult to break away from without assistance.

What Are the Signs of a Fentanyl Addiction?

Knowing what a fentanyl addiction looks like is the place to start in helping yourself or a loved one get clear of it.

Signs of addiction can look like this:

  • Unable to stop using on your own
  • Taking larger doses because a tolerance has developed
  • Spending a large chunk of your day and money getting, using and recovering from fentanyl
  • Severe cravings
  • Failing to meet obligations at work, home or school
  • Continuing to use despite overtly negative outcomes
  • Not participating in activities that once brought joy
  • Legal and financial trouble due to needing to get money for fentanyl
  • Putting yourself in dangerous situations
  • Withdrawal symptoms develop when you stop using
  • Difficulty breathing, coughing, sneezing and chest pain
  • Convulsions and chills
  • Pain in the back or sides
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Pale skin
  • Severe constipation and /or black stool
  • Ulcers and sores in the mouth
  • Sunken eyes
  • Swollen feet, ankles and hands and/or numbness in the extremities
  • Generally fatigued
  • Loss of appetite
  • Mood swings and irritability
  • Depression
  • Insomnia

As you can see, fentanyl takes a severe toll, wreaking absolute havoc on your system and only getting worse the longer it goes unchecked.

Why You Should Go to a Fentanyl Rehab

Addiction to a substance that’s so powerful and so devastating requires equally formidable action. Fentanyl rehab is that type of action.

Getting dedicated and customized treatment for your addiction in a supportive environment increases your odds of success immensely.

After safely detoxing under the guidance and supervision of specialists, you’ll begin an individualized treatment program; for fentanyl, it’s often an inpatient program given how powerful the drug is. In rehab, you’ll be surrounded by people who truly understand what you’re going through and participate in one-on-one psychotherapy to work through what led you to fentanyl in the first place. This is complemented by group work where you can build bonds with others and realize you’re never alone on this journey. To learn more about fentanyl rehab, reach out to us at Principles Recovery Center.

Drug Rehab Facilities in Florida Explained

Drug Rehab Facilities in Florida Explained

There are few things in life more empowering than the decision to seek help for an addiction and realize you do have the power to take control over your life back.

It’s a tough journey, no doubt, but one that only gets better as you go.

With the ocean breeze and sunshine soothing the soul, drug rehab facilities in Florida make those arduous early days a bit more pleasant and set you up for long-term success.

What Are the Common Signs and Symptoms of Addiction?

Addiction may feel like it pops up unannounced overnight like your in-laws but, truth be told, there are warning signs and symptoms that emerge and metastasize.

Our natural inclination is sometimes to excuse these signs because no one wants to suspect the worst of their family member or friend; that they’re an addict. They’re just stressed, they’re actually in control of their usage, they’re not hurting anyone, they’re always a little moody, etc. It’s understandable but it’s also enabling.

In order to get your loved one the help they need to overcome addiction, you must be on the lookout for these symptoms and act when you know they’ve reached a tipping point so to speak.

The signs of substance abuse are a mixed bag between behavioral and physical and can include:

  • Being overly secretive and lying
  • Unable to quit despite efforts to do so
  • Losing interest in events or activities they once enjoyed so they can use
  • Insomnia or, conversely, sleeping too much
  • Financial issues and unpredictability related to buying drugs or alcohol
  • Borrowing or stealing to pay for substances
  • School, work and/or family life and obligations are all suffering
  • Considerable changes in weight, up or down
  • Paranoia
  • Spending a disproportionate amount of time using substances, thinking about them, acquiring them and recovering from their effects 
  • Developing tolerance and taking increasingly larger doses to get the same effect as before
  • Mood swings and irritability
  • Continuing to use despite clear negative ramifications
  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Engaging in risky behavior, i.e., driving under the influence
  • Shifting to a different group of friends who use as well
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms when you stop using
  • Body odor, wearing dirty clothes, hair unkempt, etc. a general lack of care for personal hygiene

A person may not experience everything listed but someone who’s addicted will certainly exhibit some of them. It’s critical to pay attention and take action before things spiral fully out of control.

What that action will look like is different for everyone. A good place to start is getting educated on addiction yourself and talking to experts on the next steps, you can even reach out to us at Principles Recovery Center to learn more and get advice.

Why Principles Should Be Your Drug Rehab Facility in Florida

There ain’t much better than the Florida coast.

Over 8,000 miles of shoreline – 8,436 to be exact – a relaxed environment and well over 200 sunny days (hence our nickname; The Sunshine State) makes Florida a pretty enviable place to be.

We get it, it’s why we’re based here and it’s part of how we started.

At Principles Recovery Center, we’ve been treating substance abuse for over 30 years and our combined experience means we’ve done just about everything in that time.

The beauty of Principles, aside from the location, is that you can take your entire recovery journey with us which creates an unrivaled sense of comfort and trust. You’ll be able to transition smoothly from inpatient care to outpatient rehab and once you’ve wrapped up treatment we’ll help you with aftercare options as well as a lively alumni program that helps you maintain connections with us and those you’ve met in rehab.

Give us a call to discover more about why Principles is the right place for you or a loved one.

What Are Trauma Therapy Modalities in Addiction Treatment?

What Are Trauma Therapy Modalities in Addiction Treatment?

Treatment for addiction will look different for everyone. There’s no silver bullet or one-size-fits-all solution that is recommended for each person dealing with addiction. Just as you’re a unique individual who fell into substance abuse due to the very personal circumstances of your own life, climbing out of it requires a similarly individualized plan.

Because of that, there are a number of therapies that can be used either in tandem or by themselves to build a rehab program that suits your story and can help you overcome addiction.

This is particularly important because often, a substance use disorder (SUD) will coincide with a trauma-induced mental disorder.

Are Trauma and Substance Abuse Related?

Not only are trauma and substance abuse related but mental illness, in general, is linked with addiction in what’s known as a comorbidity, which is defined by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) as:

“When a person has two or more disorders at the same time or one after the other. This occurs frequently with substance use and mental disorders. Comorbidity also means that interactions between these two disorders can worsen the course of both.”

They go on to note that, “of the 20.3 million adults with substance use disorders, 37.9% also had mental illnesses” and “among the 42.1 million adults with mental illness, 18.2% also had substance use disorders”.

Trauma very much falls into this equation with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) pointing out that “substance use (e.g., smoking, excessive alcohol use, and taking drugs), mental health conditions (e.g., depression, anxiety, or PTSD), and other risky behaviors (e.g., self-injury and risky sexual encounters) have been linked with traumatic experiences”.

Drugs and alcohol are used as coping mechanisms to deal with the unresolved and untreated trauma a person is living with. Escapism in a sense.

This cuts across all parts of society.

For example, a study about urban populations found that “there are high rates of lifetime dependence on various substances in this high-risk population. Additionally, the level of substance use, particularly cocaine, is strongly associated with levels of childhood physical, sexual, and emotional abuse as well as current PTSD symptoms.”

And the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adds, “more than 2 of 10 Veterans with PTSD also have SUD”

What Are the Different Trauma Therapy Modalities in Addiction Treatment?

Fortunately, dual-diagnosis treatment – a type of rehab that helps you work through trauma and addiction – is available.

In fact, there are several trauma therapy modalities out there and we’ll touch on a couple of the most notable here:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

An evidence-based type of psychotherapy, or talk therapy, is predicated on helping you recognize and identify negative and detrimental thought patterns that have a destructive impact on your life and shift them.

It’s been called the “gold standard of psychotherapy”.

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT)

A type of cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavioral therapy is also a form of talk therapy with the distinction being that it’s more about acceptance, living in the moment, coping with stressors and improving how you deal with others.

How Principles Recovery Center Can Help You With Addiction Today

When you consider the seemingly infinite ways in which someone can find their lives intertwined with substances, the ability to have your treatment be specific to your circumstances is crucial. Be it CBT, DBT, group therapy or holistic options, a customized rehab experience goes a long way in creating positive outcomes.

At Principles Recovery Center in Davie, Florida, our 30+ years of combined experience treating substance abuse through dual-diagnosis treatment mean we’re well suited to help you beat your addiction and resolve the trauma at the root of it.

Reach out to us today to learn more and get on the road to recovery.

One of the Best Rehabs in Florida

Best rehabs in Florida

When you think of Florida, you no doubt think of sea and sun, it’s why we’re known as the Sunshine State after all.

In recent years though, it’s become much more than just a vacation destination and is now well regarded for the quality drug and alcohol treatment centers throughout the state too.

We’d humbly submit that our own facility, Principles Recovery Center, is among the best rehabs in Florida.

Located in Davie, Florida just outside of Fort Lauderdale and stone’s throw from the coast, what makes Principles an exceptional choice comes down to one word: experience.

Sure, the beach is nice but what you really need in recovery is a team of caring and dedicated professionals who’ve devoted their lives to not only providing help for those who need it most but continuously improving along the way.

We’ve been at this for over 30 years and that commitment to helping you confront and overcome addiction has been and will remain, our driving force.

Addiction Treatment We Offer At Principles Recovery Center

Treatment for substance abuse is a process and we can take you from the beginning all the way through to the end (in Spanish too!).

Detoxification

The very first step of that process, just after deciding to enter rehab, is detox. Substance use disorders (SUDs) may be classed as brain disorders but addiction is heavily interwoven with the body as well. You need to break the physical dependency before we can help you through the mental side of it. While we don’t offer detox at our facility, we partner with many facilities in the area who you can detox with before visiting us. 

Inpatient Care

Detox isn’t a treatment in and of itself, it’s just the start. The next step for those with more severe addiction is most likely going to be a stay in inpatient care. We create a highly customized program suited to your needs and you live with us for 1 to 3 months on average, getting the 24/7 care, guidance and support you need. While we don’t offer traditional inpatient care, we have onsite housing for our clients that join us for partial hospitalization. You get all of the benefits of inpatient care with just a little more freedom. 

Partial Hospitalization

Think of this as a step below inpatient care, it essentially affords you all the benefits of an inpatient program without having to be an inpatient. In other words, you can go home in the evenings. Typically, this would be 25 hours a week and can be used as a transition from inpatient care or a starting point.

Outpatient

Another step down in terms of intensity and time commitment is outpatient care. We use all the same methods and modalities you would encounter in the aforementioned treatments with the difference here being that the sessions are shorter, affording you more time for work, school or family life. You can expect 12 to 20 hours depending on the severity of your addiction.

Dual-Diagnosis

Addiction doesn’t always happen on its own. Often people have a co-occurring mental illness along with their substance abuse problem and treating one without touching the other is setting yourself for failure. It’s critical to address and treat both disorders so you can build your newly gained sobriety on a sturdy foundation.

Adolescents & Teens

Not everyone experiences a substance use disorder in the same way and that’s particularly true for teens. More importantly, if we can get to adolescents and young people before things get out of hand, we can help them avoid a prolonged addiction and the difficulties associated with it later in life.

Aftercare

Recovery doesn’t end when your program does, it’s an ongoing and lifelong journey. At Principles Recovery Center we offer aftercare planning services that help set you up for the rest of your life, things like; career workshops, developing your interview skills, assistance with finding housing and more.

Alumni Program

It’s important to stay connected, you’re part of the PRC family after all! During your time with us, you’ll make connections with us and we’ll connect deeply with you too, so we make it easy to stay connected long after you’ve moved on because those relationships are cherished!

With alumni meetings, remote outpatient care, events and a newsletter you’ll never be too far from a friend.

How to Get Yourself or Your Loved One Help With Addiction Today

Whether it’s for yourself or someone close to you, overcoming addiction is possible.

Reach out to us today to learn more about how Principles Recovery Center can help you achieve lasting sobriety. 

Tips for Overcoming Trauma and Addiction

Tips for overcoming trauma and addiction

Traumatic experiences can come to hold immense power over your thoughts, feelings and actions in life. Touching all aspects of your inner world as well as wreaking havoc on your external relationships. 

While some may go through a harrowing experience and be able to easily put it behind them, for others overcoming trauma is a much more arduous journey. In the worst cases, trauma can lead you down the road of addiction and the potentially fatal consequences that accompany prolonged substance abuse.

The co-occurrence of the two – trauma and addiction – isn’t uncommon either, with studies showing that “individuals with PTSD were 2 to 4 times more likely than individuals without PTSD to meet criteria for an SUD (substance use disorder)”.

Before getting into the tips for working through anything though, we need to properly define the terms.

What Is Trauma?

As defined by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), “individual trauma results from an event, series of events, or set of circumstances that is experienced by an individual as physically or emotionally harmful or life-threatening and that has lasting adverse effects on the individual’s functioning and mental, physical, social, emotional, or spiritual well-being”.

What qualifies as a traumatic event is different for each person, some examples are:

  • Sexual or physical abuse
  • Domestic violence
  • Divorce and separation from parents
  • Combat
  • Serious illness
  • Death of family member or friend
  • Natural disaster
  • Significant medical procedures 

Importantly, keep in mind that something can be traumatic for one person and have no effect on another and, also, there’s no statute of limitations on when trauma can affect you. Trauma experienced in childhood has a well-documented adverse effect in adults.

What Is Addiction?

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) defines addiction as “a chronic, relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use despite adverse consequences. It is considered a brain disorder because it involves functional changes to brain circuits involved in reward, stress, and self-control. Those changes may last a long time after a person has stopped taking drugs”.

Tips for Overcoming Trauma and Addiction – Dual Diagnosis Treatment

When you’re dealing with two or more disorders simultaneously, it’s referred to as a comorbidity. NIDA explains “this occurs frequently with substance use and mental disorders. Comorbidity also means that interactions between these two disorders can worsen the course of both”.

Given that, the best tip for working through co-occurring disorders is to treat them both at the same time.

There isn’t a silver bullet or shortcut to overcoming one and not the other because they tend to make each other worse, as mentioned. Trauma may well lead you to substances as a coping mechanism to get through the difficulties. 

As your dependency on drugs or alcohol grows you feel like you need the substance to feel “normal”. As your tolerance builds, you consequently need more and more to feel like “yourself” and avoid thinking about the trauma that brought on the addiction to begin with.

That cycle becomes dangerous quickly.

Getting treatment for only your substance use disorder and not addressing the trauma that preceded and caused it, in many ways leaves you untreated. Sure, you may leave rehab sober but the coping mechanisms you learned might not stand a chance when something triggers you to remember that prior traumatic experience.

That’s why working through them together, in a dual-diagnosis treatment program, gives you the best shot at overcoming them both and leading a substance-free life without the pain and torment of trauma.

If trauma (or any other mental disorder) and addiction seem insurmountable for you or a loved one, reach out to us at Principles Recovery Center in South Florida, and we can shine more light on the benefits of dual-diagnosis treatment.

The First Step to Getting Clean: Drug Detox in Florida

First steps to getting clean in Florida

Drug addiction is something that takes hold of the body and mind.

The longer you or a loved one is addicted, the more control is lost and the stronger the dependency grows.

That’s the nature of the beast.

It doesn’t get better until you choose to get better and getting to the point that you can confidently make that choice is a big win in its own right. Once you’ve decided to commit to getting clean though, a new journey begins; the one towards sobriety.

As the saying goes, a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

And the first step is detox.

Why Is Drug Detox Usually the First Step to Take When Getting Clean?

As mentioned, a substance use disorder is both mental and physical. In order to treat the mental side of addiction, you first have to break the physical dependency. 

In layman’s terms, detox is the process of the body ridding itself of drugs or alcohol.

Depending on the severity of the addiction and the substance, this can be assisted by medication to help mitigate the withdrawal symptoms.

Of course, detox on its own is not the end of the road. It’s not rehab or a “cure” by itself. It’s merely a step. An absolutely critical and imperative one but still just one step on the road to recovery with the next typically being inpatient or outpatient care.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse puts it this way, “detoxification alone does not address the psychological, social, and behavioral problems associated with addiction and therefore does not typically produce lasting behavioral changes necessary for recovery. Detoxification should thus be followed by a formal assessment and referral to drug addiction treatment”.

Why You Want to Detox From Drugs at a Rehab

It’s tempting to go it alone and try to detox at home – through sheer power of will – but there are a number of reasons why that may not be the best idea.

Dangerous to Do It at Home or Alone

Simply put, it’s unsafe and depending on the substance, withdrawal may actually kill you. Detox from alcohol and benzodiazepine, for example, can be fatal if done without proper care and guidance.

With more severe addiction, it’s particularly important to detox at a rehab because medication-assisted detox is an option to lessen the effects of withdrawal.

Avoid Temptation

Withdrawal symptoms are not pleasant and that’s just about the nicest way to put it. Your body and mind have both grown accustomed to a constant supply of chemicals – a supply which increases steadily as you build a tolerance – cutting it off abruptly throws your entire system into havoc.

If you’re on your own, you could easily succumb to the discomfort and fall back to using it to get relief. 

Supervised, Safe & Supported

Choosing to detox at a rehab means you’re able to overcome the dangers of quitting cold turkey and the cravings that withdrawal brings.

How?

Because at a facility, you’re under the supervision of trained addiction specialists and supported by the staff 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Should any complications arise there are medical professionals on hand to administer aid and manage the situation safely. 

Everyone is there to help guide you safely through the process and get you to a point where you can take the next step in recovery which is starting to work on the mental side of addiction.

Reach Out to Us Today at Principles Recovery Center for Help With Your Addiction

Ultimately, getting clean requires cleaning out the body and detoxification under the direction and care of experts is the best way to minimize risk and maximize the possibility of success.

Reach out to us at Principles Recovery Center to learn more about our program for alcohol and drug detox in Florida.

Outpatient Treatment Center Explained

Drug and alcohol outpatient rehbailitaiton treatment center

The realization that an addiction to drugs or alcohol has taken over your life is one that can hit hard and stop your life in its tracks – or at least it feels that way. Like it brings the spin of the earth to a halt.

In reality though, life around you does go on. Your responsibilities to family and friends carry on and the job you managed to maintain continues to require doing.

Depending on the severity of your addiction, it may be in your best interest to opt for inpatient care, where you live at a treatment center. In that case, you’re fully pulled out of that life – your former world – and focus 100% of your energy and attention on rehabilitation.

For those with the most severe issues with substance use, that could be the right way to go but what if your addiction isn’t that intense? What if your work or family life absolutely requires your presence? What is after you finish inpatient you still need help? 

How do you square that circle and make it work while getting the care for addiction you genuinely need?

Outpatient treatment.

What Is Outpatient Treatment?

For starters, let’s quickly discuss what inpatient treatment is because one informs the other.

As previously stated, inpatient rehab requires you to live at the facility where you’re being treated. Any reputable recovery center will create a highly structured and personalized plan that is suited to your particular needs.

Though the methods and modalities will vary from rehab to rehab, the foundation of most programs is in psychotherapy, or talk therapy. Here at Principles Recovery Center, for example, we utilize cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, dialectical behavior therapy and more – in both individual and group settings – to help you work through the mental aspects of addiction during our outpatient programs. 

That’s in addition to complementary and holistic treatment options that work to create a well-rounded path to recovery.

How does that relate to outpatient care?

Well, rehab at an outpatient treatment center encompasses the same things and it uses the very same tools to aid you in your journey towards lasting sobriety. The key difference is that with outpatient rehab you are not required to live at the facility.

The quality of care isn’t any less than that of inpatient care, it’s simply designed and intended for a different subset of the recovery population. Someone suffering from the most severe, heavy addiction wouldn’t necessarily be an ideal candidate for outpatient treatment because they genuinely need the 24/7 support, guidance and supervision that inpatient rehab provides.

However, just like addiction itself, there are different degrees of outpatient care.

Intensive outpatient program (IOP), for instance, is one of these degrees. Somewhere between partial hospitalization and more run-of-the-mill outpatient treatment, patients undergoing intensive outpatient care spend substantially more time in treatment, often in the neighborhood of 20 hours a week or so – but still go home at the end of the day. 

Who Should Go to an Outpatient Treatment Center?

Outpatient care, the standard kind, is the type of treatment that requires the least time and is, therefore, the most accessible.

For those who have work, school or familial responsibilities that must be fulfilled, outpatient treatment offers both the flexibility and structure to allow you to do what you have to while still getting the critical support for recovery that you need. It’s a treatment option that you can incorporate into your schedule.

Additionally, rather than jumping straight back into the grind of daily life, outpatient rehab is also especially useful as a transitional tool for those who have completed an inpatient program. Offering something of a safety net as you reintegrate into your day-to-day.  To find out if outpatient treatment is right for you or a loved one, get in touch with us at Principles Recovery Center. We’d be happy to give you more information and tell you about our South Florida outpatient program.