One of the Best Rehabs in Florida

Best rehabs in Florida

When you think of Florida, you no doubt think of sea and sun, it’s why we’re known as the Sunshine State after all.

In recent years though, it’s become much more than just a vacation destination and is now well regarded for the quality drug and alcohol treatment centers throughout the state too.

We’d humbly submit that our own facility, Principles Recovery Center, is among the best rehabs in Florida.

Located in Davie, Florida just outside of Fort Lauderdale and stone’s throw from the coast, what makes Principles an exceptional choice comes down to one word: experience.

Sure, the beach is nice but what you really need in recovery is a team of caring and dedicated professionals who’ve devoted their lives to not only providing help for those who need it most but continuously improving along the way.

We’ve been at this for over 30 years and that commitment to helping you confront and overcome addiction has been and will remain, our driving force.

Addiction Treatment We Offer At Principles Recovery Center

Treatment for substance abuse is a process and we can take you from the beginning all the way through to the end (in Spanish too!).

Detoxification

The very first step of that process, just after deciding to enter rehab, is detox. Substance use disorders (SUDs) may be classed as brain disorders but addiction is heavily interwoven with the body as well. You need to break the physical dependency before we can help you through the mental side of it. While we don’t offer detox at our facility, we partner with many facilities in the area who you can detox with before visiting us. 

Inpatient Care

Detox isn’t a treatment in and of itself, it’s just the start. The next step for those with more severe addiction is most likely going to be a stay in inpatient care. We create a highly customized program suited to your needs and you live with us for 1 to 3 months on average, getting the 24/7 care, guidance and support you need. While we don’t offer traditional inpatient care, we have onsite housing for our clients that join us for partial hospitalization. You get all of the benefits of inpatient care with just a little more freedom. 

Partial Hospitalization

Think of this as a step below inpatient care, it essentially affords you all the benefits of an inpatient program without having to be an inpatient. In other words, you can go home in the evenings. Typically, this would be 25 hours a week and can be used as a transition from inpatient care or a starting point.

Outpatient

Another step down in terms of intensity and time commitment is outpatient care. We use all the same methods and modalities you would encounter in the aforementioned treatments with the difference here being that the sessions are shorter, affording you more time for work, school or family life. You can expect 12 to 20 hours depending on the severity of your addiction.

Dual-Diagnosis

Addiction doesn’t always happen on its own. Often people have a co-occurring mental illness along with their substance abuse problem and treating one without touching the other is setting yourself for failure. It’s critical to address and treat both disorders so you can build your newly gained sobriety on a sturdy foundation.

Adolescents & Teens

Not everyone experiences a substance use disorder in the same way and that’s particularly true for teens. More importantly, if we can get to adolescents and young people before things get out of hand, we can help them avoid a prolonged addiction and the difficulties associated with it later in life.

Aftercare

Recovery doesn’t end when your program does, it’s an ongoing and lifelong journey. At Principles Recovery Center we offer aftercare planning services that help set you up for the rest of your life, things like; career workshops, developing your interview skills, assistance with finding housing and more.

Alumni Program

It’s important to stay connected, you’re part of the PRC family after all! During your time with us, you’ll make connections with us and we’ll connect deeply with you too, so we make it easy to stay connected long after you’ve moved on because those relationships are cherished!

With alumni meetings, remote outpatient care, events and a newsletter you’ll never be too far from a friend.

How to Get Yourself or Your Loved One Help With Addiction Today

Whether it’s for yourself or someone close to you, overcoming addiction is possible.

Reach out to us today to learn more about how Principles Recovery Center can help you achieve lasting sobriety. 

Tips for Overcoming Trauma and Addiction

Tips for overcoming trauma and addiction

Traumatic experiences can come to hold immense power over your thoughts, feelings and actions in life. Touching all aspects of your inner world as well as wreaking havoc on your external relationships. 

While some may go through a harrowing experience and be able to easily put it behind them, for others overcoming trauma is a much more arduous journey. In the worst cases, trauma can lead you down the road of addiction and the potentially fatal consequences that accompany prolonged substance abuse.

The co-occurrence of the two – trauma and addiction – isn’t uncommon either, with studies showing that “individuals with PTSD were 2 to 4 times more likely than individuals without PTSD to meet criteria for an SUD (substance use disorder)”.

Before getting into the tips for working through anything though, we need to properly define the terms.

What Is Trauma?

As defined by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), “individual trauma results from an event, series of events, or set of circumstances that is experienced by an individual as physically or emotionally harmful or life-threatening and that has lasting adverse effects on the individual’s functioning and mental, physical, social, emotional, or spiritual well-being”.

What qualifies as a traumatic event is different for each person, some examples are:

  • Sexual or physical abuse
  • Domestic violence
  • Divorce and separation from parents
  • Combat
  • Serious illness
  • Death of family member or friend
  • Natural disaster
  • Significant medical procedures 

Importantly, keep in mind that something can be traumatic for one person and have no effect on another and, also, there’s no statute of limitations on when trauma can affect you. Trauma experienced in childhood has a well-documented adverse effect in adults.

What Is Addiction?

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) defines addiction as “a chronic, relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use despite adverse consequences. It is considered a brain disorder because it involves functional changes to brain circuits involved in reward, stress, and self-control. Those changes may last a long time after a person has stopped taking drugs”.

Tips for Overcoming Trauma and Addiction – Dual Diagnosis Treatment

When you’re dealing with two or more disorders simultaneously, it’s referred to as a comorbidity. NIDA explains “this occurs frequently with substance use and mental disorders. Comorbidity also means that interactions between these two disorders can worsen the course of both”.

Given that, the best tip for working through co-occurring disorders is to treat them both at the same time.

There isn’t a silver bullet or shortcut to overcoming one and not the other because they tend to make each other worse, as mentioned. Trauma may well lead you to substances as a coping mechanism to get through the difficulties. 

As your dependency on drugs or alcohol grows you feel like you need the substance to feel “normal”. As your tolerance builds, you consequently need more and more to feel like “yourself” and avoid thinking about the trauma that brought on the addiction to begin with.

That cycle becomes dangerous quickly.

Getting treatment for only your substance use disorder and not addressing the trauma that preceded and caused it, in many ways leaves you untreated. Sure, you may leave rehab sober but the coping mechanisms you learned might not stand a chance when something triggers you to remember that prior traumatic experience.

That’s why working through them together, in a dual-diagnosis treatment program, gives you the best shot at overcoming them both and leading a substance-free life without the pain and torment of trauma.

If trauma (or any other mental disorder) and addiction seem insurmountable for you or a loved one, reach out to us at Principles Recovery Center in South Florida, and we can shine more light on the benefits of dual-diagnosis treatment.

The First Step to Getting Clean: Drug Detox in Florida

First steps to getting clean in Florida

Drug addiction is something that takes hold of the body and mind.

The longer you or a loved one is addicted, the more control is lost and the stronger the dependency grows.

That’s the nature of the beast.

It doesn’t get better until you choose to get better and getting to the point that you can confidently make that choice is a big win in its own right. Once you’ve decided to commit to getting clean though, a new journey begins; the one towards sobriety.

As the saying goes, a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

And the first step is detox.

Why Is Drug Detox Usually the First Step to Take When Getting Clean?

As mentioned, a substance use disorder is both mental and physical. In order to treat the mental side of addiction, you first have to break the physical dependency. 

In layman’s terms, detox is the process of the body ridding itself of drugs or alcohol.

Depending on the severity of the addiction and the substance, this can be assisted by medication to help mitigate the withdrawal symptoms.

Of course, detox on its own is not the end of the road. It’s not rehab or a “cure” by itself. It’s merely a step. An absolutely critical and imperative one but still just one step on the road to recovery with the next typically being inpatient or outpatient care.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse puts it this way, “detoxification alone does not address the psychological, social, and behavioral problems associated with addiction and therefore does not typically produce lasting behavioral changes necessary for recovery. Detoxification should thus be followed by a formal assessment and referral to drug addiction treatment”.

Why You Want to Detox From Drugs at a Rehab

It’s tempting to go it alone and try to detox at home – through sheer power of will – but there are a number of reasons why that may not be the best idea.

Dangerous to Do It at Home or Alone

Simply put, it’s unsafe and depending on the substance, withdrawal may actually kill you. Detox from alcohol and benzodiazepine, for example, can be fatal if done without proper care and guidance.

With more severe addiction, it’s particularly important to detox at a rehab because medication-assisted detox is an option to lessen the effects of withdrawal.

Avoid Temptation

Withdrawal symptoms are not pleasant and that’s just about the nicest way to put it. Your body and mind have both grown accustomed to a constant supply of chemicals – a supply which increases steadily as you build a tolerance – cutting it off abruptly throws your entire system into havoc.

If you’re on your own, you could easily succumb to the discomfort and fall back to using it to get relief. 

Supervised, Safe & Supported

Choosing to detox at a rehab means you’re able to overcome the dangers of quitting cold turkey and the cravings that withdrawal brings.

How?

Because at a facility, you’re under the supervision of trained addiction specialists and supported by the staff 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Should any complications arise there are medical professionals on hand to administer aid and manage the situation safely. 

Everyone is there to help guide you safely through the process and get you to a point where you can take the next step in recovery which is starting to work on the mental side of addiction.

Reach Out to Us Today at Principles Recovery Center for Help With Your Addiction

Ultimately, getting clean requires cleaning out the body and detoxification under the direction and care of experts is the best way to minimize risk and maximize the possibility of success.

Reach out to us at Principles Recovery Center to learn more about our program for alcohol and drug detox in Florida.

Outpatient Treatment Center Explained

Drug and alcohol outpatient rehbailitaiton treatment center

The realization that an addiction to drugs or alcohol has taken over your life is one that can hit hard and stop your life in its tracks – or at least it feels that way. Like it brings the spin of the earth to a halt.

In reality though, life around you does go on. Your responsibilities to family and friends carry on and the job you managed to maintain continues to require doing.

Depending on the severity of your addiction, it may be in your best interest to opt for inpatient care, where you live at a treatment center. In that case, you’re fully pulled out of that life – your former world – and focus 100% of your energy and attention on rehabilitation.

For those with the most severe issues with substance use, that could be the right way to go but what if your addiction isn’t that intense? What if your work or family life absolutely requires your presence? What is after you finish inpatient you still need help? 

How do you square that circle and make it work while getting the care for addiction you genuinely need?

Outpatient treatment.

What Is Outpatient Treatment?

For starters, let’s quickly discuss what inpatient treatment is because one informs the other.

As previously stated, inpatient rehab requires you to live at the facility where you’re being treated. Any reputable recovery center will create a highly structured and personalized plan that is suited to your particular needs.

Though the methods and modalities will vary from rehab to rehab, the foundation of most programs is in psychotherapy, or talk therapy. Here at Principles Recovery Center, for example, we utilize cognitive behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, dialectical behavior therapy and more – in both individual and group settings – to help you work through the mental aspects of addiction during our outpatient programs. 

That’s in addition to complementary and holistic treatment options that work to create a well-rounded path to recovery.

How does that relate to outpatient care?

Well, rehab at an outpatient treatment center encompasses the same things and it uses the very same tools to aid you in your journey towards lasting sobriety. The key difference is that with outpatient rehab you are not required to live at the facility.

The quality of care isn’t any less than that of inpatient care, it’s simply designed and intended for a different subset of the recovery population. Someone suffering from the most severe, heavy addiction wouldn’t necessarily be an ideal candidate for outpatient treatment because they genuinely need the 24/7 support, guidance and supervision that inpatient rehab provides.

However, just like addiction itself, there are different degrees of outpatient care.

Intensive outpatient program (IOP), for instance, is one of these degrees. Somewhere between partial hospitalization and more run-of-the-mill outpatient treatment, patients undergoing intensive outpatient care spend substantially more time in treatment, often in the neighborhood of 20 hours a week or so – but still go home at the end of the day. 

Who Should Go to an Outpatient Treatment Center?

Outpatient care, the standard kind, is the type of treatment that requires the least time and is, therefore, the most accessible.

For those who have work, school or familial responsibilities that must be fulfilled, outpatient treatment offers both the flexibility and structure to allow you to do what you have to while still getting the critical support for recovery that you need. It’s a treatment option that you can incorporate into your schedule.

Additionally, rather than jumping straight back into the grind of daily life, outpatient rehab is also especially useful as a transitional tool for those who have completed an inpatient program. Offering something of a safety net as you reintegrate into your day-to-day.  To find out if outpatient treatment is right for you or a loved one, get in touch with us at Principles Recovery Center. We’d be happy to give you more information and tell you about our South Florida outpatient program.

Six People Have Died from Lung Illnesses Linked to Vaping. Should You Quit?

Reports of six deaths and hundreds of illnesses linked to vaping THC and nicotine are scary. Here’s what you need to know.

Last week, federal health officials warned the public that a mysterious illness linked to vaping had killed a fifth person in the U.S. On Tuesday, Kansas officials confirmed that a sixth person has died. At least 450 cases of vaping-associated illness are suspected in hospitals across 33 states and one territory, with the numbers continuing to rise. Those hospitalized are mostly young and healthy and were admitted with symptoms beginning with fever and nausea, escalating to coughing, chest pain, and shortness of breath. All had vaped—either weed, nicotine, or a combination of the two—in the previous 90 days; most had vaped much more recently.

The cases represent a small percentage of the vaping population, but the severity of the illness—which looks like viral or bacterial pneumonia, but isn’t—has investigators worried. (An editorial in The New England Journal of Medicine declared “there is clearly an epidemic that begs for an urgent response,” and that doctors “should discourage their patients from vaping.”) Doctors have described “severe lung injury” and, in one death in an older patient, a “long and complicated hospitalization.” One patient, chronicled in The Washington Post, went from feeling sick to being “on death’s door” in two days; six weeks after leaving the hospital the 20-year-old former hiker still has diminished lung capacity and struggles with his short-term memory. Doctors aren’t sure whether he’ll fully recover.

While authorities have published case studies describing the acute lung disorder observed in people who vape, its exact cause remains unclear. It hasn’t been linked to a specific product or device; investigators also aren’t sure whether it’s a new phenomenon or something they’re just recognizing, though details point to the former.

As a discerning user, how can you know if you’re vaping responsibly? We asked the experts.

Am I safe if I’m avoiding THC vapes?

No. “Many but not all of the cases have been linked to THC-containing products,” said MeiLan K. Han, professor of internal medicine in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Michigan Medicine and director of the Michigan Airways Program. She notes that Food and Drug Administration testing showed vitamin E acetate, an oil derived from vitamin E, in weed products vaped by people who’d gotten sick. That oil could be causing lung inflammation, she said. But not everyone who got sick reported using such products, and some were using only nicotine vape product. “At this time there is no guaranteed ‘safe’ form of vaping,” Han said.

How can I tell if my vape is safe to use?

The FDA has warned vapers against buying products “off the street,” or those that have been mixed or tampered with, implying that “reputable” products are safer. But as Buckles noted, “There is no regulation or inspection of these manufacturers or vape shops, so there is no way to tell if a device or liquid is from a ‘reputable place.’” This means that even if you’re using a fancy pen that you bought legally in L.A., you can’t be guaranteed to escape this mystery illness. In June 2017, the Trump administration delayed rules being put in place for the e-cigarette industry by four years—they’re set to go into effect in 2022, though a court case may accelerate the deadline.

Wow, ok. I vape several times a day. Should I completely stop?

“Yes, you should stop completely,” said Deborah Buckles, program director of the Tobacco Treatment Program at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center. Because investigators haven’t identified the source of the lung disorder, she said, right now the safest bet is simply not to vape. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Friday that it recommends not vaping while the investigation is ongoing.

Uh, but I’m addicted to nicotine, and THC helps me sleep. Are cigarettes less risky for me than vapes?

Combustible cigs are still bad for you, as you well know. “Cigarettes contain their own risks for increasing risk of lung cancer, heart disease, and a host of other lung problems,” Han said. “The bottom line is that the lungs were not designed to breathe anything other than clean air. Anything other than that is a potential health risk.”

The health risks of cigarettes are well known; right now, the risks from vaping are not well understood—and that lack of information goes beyond the current spate of illnesses. That’s because e-cigarettes are a relatively recent phenomenon. Touted as a safer alternative to cigarettes, they were brought to market with very little scientific study; there are a lot of unknowns about them, and the more they’re studied, the less safe they seem to be.

“Vape shop owners and e-cigarette manufacturers like to say they are helpful with quitting smoking,” Buckles said, “However, there is no evidence at this time to indicate this is true.” The FDA regulates vapes as tobacco products and has not approved them for smoking cessation or anything else.