Find a Fentanyl Rehab Today | Principle Recovery

Find a Fentanyl Rehab Today

At this point, everyone in the country is likely familiar with opioids and the decimation they brought on families from coast to coast.

Fentanyl is a monster in its own right and worth diving into to understand better.

What Is Fentanyl?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) describe fentanyl as such; “a synthetic opioid, approved for treating severe pain, typically advanced cancer pain. It is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine”.

It bears repeating, fentanyl is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine. Truly astounding.

Given its potency, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) categorizes it as a Schedule II drug, or one with a “high potential for abuse, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. These drugs are also considered dangerous”.

When prescribed by doctors, it’s commonly taken as a shot, a patch or lozenge similar to a cough drop and works just like other opioids by binding to opioid receptors to alleviate pain and create a sense of euphoria.

When procured illegally, it can come in powder, liquid or pill form and is often mixed with other drugs because it takes so little to create a big effect on the user.

Because of this, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), fentanyl has driven the steep rise in opioid overdoses since 2013. They add that “synthetic opioids, including fentanyl, are now the most common drugs involved in drug overdose deaths in the United States”.

Recent figures from the CDC show that “overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids were nearly 12 times higher in 2019 than in 2013” with more than 36,000 deaths in 2019 alone.

In general, it’s the illegally produced, non-pharmaceutical fentanyl that’s the culprit in overdoses.

Lastly, because of how strong it is, fentanyl is very addictive and extremely difficult to break away from without assistance.

What Are the Signs of a Fentanyl Addiction?

Knowing what a fentanyl addiction looks like is the place to start in helping yourself or a loved one get clear of it.

Signs of addiction can look like this:

  • Unable to stop using on your own
  • Taking larger doses because a tolerance has developed
  • Spending a large chunk of your day and money getting, using and recovering from fentanyl
  • Severe cravings
  • Failing to meet obligations at work, home or school
  • Continuing to use despite overtly negative outcomes
  • Not participating in activities that once brought joy
  • Legal and financial trouble due to needing to get money for fentanyl
  • Putting yourself in dangerous situations
  • Withdrawal symptoms develop when you stop using
  • Difficulty breathing, coughing, sneezing and chest pain
  • Convulsions and chills
  • Pain in the back or sides
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Pale skin
  • Severe constipation and /or black stool
  • Ulcers and sores in the mouth
  • Sunken eyes
  • Swollen feet, ankles and hands and/or numbness in the extremities
  • Generally fatigued
  • Loss of appetite
  • Mood swings and irritability
  • Depression
  • Insomnia

As you can see, fentanyl takes a severe toll, wreaking absolute havoc on your system and only getting worse the longer it goes unchecked.

Why You Should Go to a Fentanyl Rehab

Addiction to a substance that’s so powerful and so devastating requires equally formidable action. Fentanyl rehab is that type of action.

Getting dedicated and customized treatment for your addiction in a supportive environment increases your odds of success immensely.

After safely detoxing under the guidance and supervision of specialists, you’ll begin an individualized treatment program; for fentanyl, it’s often an inpatient program given how powerful the drug is. In rehab, you’ll be surrounded by people who truly understand what you’re going through and participate in one-on-one psychotherapy to work through what led you to fentanyl in the first place. This is complemented by group work where you can build bonds with others and realize you’re never alone on this journey. To learn more about fentanyl rehab, reach out to us at Principles Recovery Center.

What Does ‘Nodding Off Due to Drugs’ Mean?

What Does ‘Nodding off Due to Drugs’ Mean?

To some degree, everyone has a basic understanding of the dangers of abusing drugs. Even drug users get that what they’re doing comes with incredible downside risk.

Among the dangers that don’t get discussed often is nodding off due to drugs; something that can seem almost innocent at first blush and certainly not always outwardly scary but is in actuality quite serious and hazardous.

What Does Nodding off Due to Drugs Mean?

On a basic level, nodding off or nodding out as it’s sometimes referred to is drifting in and out of consciousness after using drugs. It generally looks like a person has fallen asleep or is on the verge of falling asleep.

Given the innocuous nature of it, it doesn’t sound too intense. Almost like a nap, just drifting away in a lecture or while watching a boring movie.

But let’s dig into it further.

Nodding off means a loss of consciousness. It means mental capacity evaporates. Control of the body is gone. It can last minutes or hours, there’s no set time. It can happen anywhere a person uses drugs.

Critically, it’s not boredom-induced, it’s drug-induced.

If you take drugs just before driving, for example, and you nod off, it can be absolutely catastrophic. Even if you’re on solid ground, a nod out can cause you to collapse and injure yourself. You can nod off with a needle still in your arm, lying there limp and knocked out.

What causes this to happen though?

The answer relates to the types of drugs that lead to a nod out.

What Kind of Drugs Make Someone ‘Nod Off’?

Opioids.

It’s always opioids it seems.

While not the sole drug class that will make a person nod off, the problem is most commonly associated with opioids and in particular, heroin. You’ve probably even seen it dramatized in TV and movies with a person passed out in an alleyway, or something to that effect, after injecting heroin.

There’s a good reason nodding off is generally tied to an injection though; the quickest way to have the drug take effect is by putting it straight into the bloodstream, a direct one-way ticket to the brain.

The reason a person nods off and is overtaken by this extreme drowsiness is because of the rush of heroin infiltrating their head. Opioids, heroin being an illicit one, are a type of central nervous system depressants and come with a sensation of euphoria and deep relaxation so when you flood your brain with them it overwhelms it.

Nodding off becomes increasingly dangerous as your tolerance for opioids increases because you’ll have to take ever-increasing amounts to get the same high as the last time. Constantly nodding out then becomes a clear sign of addiction and a grim signpost en route to a possible overdose.

As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) note, “nearly 130,000 people died from overdoses related to heroin from 1999-2019”.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) added that “in 2019, 19.8% of drug overdose deaths involved heroin”.

Expanding that out further to all opioids, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) points out the stark reality; “more than 760,000 people have died since 1999 from a drug overdose. Two out of three drug overdose deaths in 2018 involved an opioid”.

How to Get Help With Addiction Today

If you or someone you love is struggling with a heroin addiction, seeking help is among the best things you can do. As we’ve all become well aware over the past couple of decades, beating opioids is tough.

At Principles Recovery Center we have over 30 years of experience successfully getting folks through it though.

Reach out to us today to learn more about the dangers of nodding off and how our substance abuse programs can help.

To some degree, everyone has a basic understanding of the dangers of abusing drugs. Even drug users get that what they’re doing comes with incredible downside risk.

Among the dangers that don’t get discussed often is nodding off due to drugs; something that can seem almost innocent at first blush and certainly not always outwardly scary but is in actuality quite serious and hazardous.

What Does Nodding off Due to Drugs Mean?

On a basic level, nodding off or nodding out as it’s sometimes referred to is drifting in and out of consciousness after using drugs. It generally looks like a person has fallen asleep or is on the verge of falling asleep.

Given the innocuous nature of it, it doesn’t sound too intense. Almost like a nap, just drifting away in a lecture or while watching a boring movie.

But let’s dig into it further.

Nodding off means a loss of consciousness. It means mental capacity evaporates. Control of the body is gone. It can last minutes or hours, there’s no set time. It can happen anywhere a person uses drugs.

Critically, it’s not boredom-induced, it’s drug-induced.

If you take drugs just before driving, for example, and you nod off, it can be absolutely catastrophic. Even if you’re on solid ground, a nod out can cause you to collapse and injure yourself. You can nod off with a needle still in your arm, lying there limp and knocked out.

What causes this to happen though?

The answer relates to the types of drugs that lead to a nod out.

What Kind of Drugs Make Someone ‘Nod Off’?

Opioids.

It’s always opioids it seems.

While not the sole drug class that will make a person nod off, the problem is most commonly associated with opioids and in particular, heroin. You’ve probably even seen it dramatized in TV and movies with a person passed out in an alleyway, or something to that effect, after injecting heroin.

There’s a good reason nodding off is generally tied to an injection though; the quickest way to have the drug take effect is by putting it straight into the bloodstream, a direct one-way ticket to the brain.

The reason a person nods off and is overtaken by this extreme drowsiness is because of the rush of heroin infiltrating their head. Opioids, heroin being an illicit one, are a type of central nervous system depressants and come with a sensation of euphoria and deep relaxation so when you flood your brain with them it overwhelms it.

Nodding off becomes increasingly dangerous as your tolerance for opioids increases because you’ll have to take ever-increasing amounts to get the same high as the last time. Constantly nodding out then becomes a clear sign of addiction and a grim signpost en route to a possible overdose.

As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) note, “nearly 130,000 people died from overdoses related to heroin from 1999-2019”.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) added that “in 2019, 19.8% of drug overdose deaths involved heroin”.

Expanding that out further to all opioids, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) points out the stark reality; “more than 760,000 people have died since 1999 from a drug overdose. Two out of three drug overdose deaths in 2018 involved an opioid”.

How to Get Help With Addiction Today

If you or someone you love is struggling with a heroin addiction, seeking help is among the best things you can do. As we’ve all become well aware over the past couple of decades, beating opioids is tough.

At Principles Recovery Center we have over 30 years of experience successfully getting folks through it though.

Reach out to us today to learn more about the dangers of nodding off and how our substance abuse programs can help.